Infragistics ASP.NET controls

Mono 3.0.4 is out! Features include Improved garbage collection, Async bug fix, and Xamarin studio support.

Mono 3.0.4 released Greetings to all of you open source patrons out there! I've just received news of the latest release of Mono (3.0.4). The new release includes several major improvements and bug fixes. In this article, I'd like to provide a brief overview highlighting the major changes in the latest release of Mono. So without further ado, here is a quick overview of what's offered in this version of the Mono project. Improved garbage collection The GC implementation has been given a makeover. These changes include: A new approach called "cementing" has been added to the SGen concurrent garbage collector. Mono allocates all new small objects in a defined memory space referred to as the nursery. When a collection occurs, the surviving objects become root objects and are copied to the major heap. Typically, few references that are allocated to the nursery survive to become roots, so the majority of the objects are instantly collected which leaves plenty of allocation space for new objects. These nursery collections minimize the work that must be done by the collector. One of the problems with the garbage collection in previous versions of mono involved instances in which objects are "pinned" in the nursery (due to managed/unmanaged references or other operations). Objects that are "pinned" cannot be moved to the major heap. Typically the collector must keep track of these "pinned" objects (and their relationships) and it rescans them on each collection attempt to try to see if they have been released and are able to be moved. This approach was an inefficient practice of the collector. This is where cementing comes in to play. Cementing is a process by which references in the nursery that are pinned are simply marked as root objects, but they remain in the nursery since they can't be moved to the heap. This dramatically reduces overhead related to pinned nursery objects and their relationships. There are also several bug fixes related to garbage collection including #9928 pointer free deadlock problem and bugs in mono_gc_weak_link_get Improved StreamReader/StreamWritter asynchronous operations The asynchronous operations have been rewritten to resolve bug #9761. Which caused the operations to fail on subsequent calls. OSX Homebrew installation conflict resolution Mono no longer installs a /usr/bin/pkg-config file on OSX, which resolves an issue that effected Homebrew installations. The installation only contains the new Gtk+ stack that allows the new Xamarin Studio to run on OSX with 3.0. This is exciting news! Conclusion (for now) Well that about wraps it up.  Oh, one more thing..   In case you haven't heard, Xamarin has released Xamarian 2.0 which includes iOS development from within Visual Studio, a brand new IDE called Xamarin studio that is geared toward developing mobile apps for Android, and iOS. The IDE runs on Windows, Linux and OSX! I would like to mention that I will be delivering a detailed refactorthis.net product review on the new and exciting features of Xamarin 2.0. So check back for my review and thanks for reading! Buddy kick it on DotNetKicks.com  


Mono 3.0 released. New improvements include asynchronous programming, Mac OS X and iOS support, ASP.NET MVC 4, Entity Framework and more

Mono 3.0 released On 10/22/2012 Miguel de Icaza blogged about the latest release of the Mono .NET project.  As you may already know, the Mono project is an open source port of the Microsoft .NET framework which allows cross platform support for .NET applications with support for such systems as Linux and Mac OS X / iOS. The Mono 3.0 release includes improved support for asynchronous programming which was introduced in .NET 4.5.  These improvements help developers to create fast, responsive applications.  The ability to keep the user interface of an application responsive while executing time consuming tasks is extremely important as applications are moving to smart phones and tablets.  The release also includes improvements that will strengthen Mono's support for Mac OS X and iOS development. Developers can also look forward to added support to Microsoft's open sourced stacks which includes technologies like: ASP.NET MVC 4, ASP.NET WebPages, Entity Framework, Razor View Engine, and System.Json. You can read about other improvements to the garbage collector and more here: Miguel de Icaza's blog post http://tirania.org/blog/archive/2012/Oct-22.html The offical Mono project's release notes http://www.mono-project.com/Release_Notes_Mono_3.0  kick it on DotNetKicks.com        


How to keep your WPF UI responsive and report progress during a long running task. C# and asynchronous multithreading.

    The problem Have you ever had to execute a bit of code that took an extremely long time to complete?  If so, I'm sure you've noticed that your user interface becomes unresponsive.  You can't use any controls on the form until the process completes.  This is extremely problematic and makes for a poor user experience. The cause This problem is because you have executed a synchronous block of code on the same thread as the user interface.  The user interface will not be able to respond to any user action until the synchronous method has completed. Let's look at an example that illustrates the execution of a synchronous method executing on the user interface thread. The example   This example is very simple.  It's a WPF application with two buttons.   One of the buttons will start a long running for loop and the other button opens a MessageBox and displays a message to let you know that the UI is active. When you click the button to start the long running process, try to click the other button.   You will notice that you are unable to click the button to show the message box.   Here's the MainWindow.xaml markup <Window x:Class="SynchronousExecution.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525"> <Grid Width="111" Height="118"> <Button Content="Start Process" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="10,10,0,0" Name="btnStartProcess" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="89" Click="btnStartProcess_Click" /> <Button Content="Try to click me" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="10,43,0,0" Name="btnTryMe" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="89" Click="btnTryMe_Click" /> </Grid> </Window>   And here is the code behind MainWindow.xaml.cs using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Windows; using System.Windows.Controls; using System.Windows.Data; using System.Windows.Documents; using System.Windows.Input; using System.Windows.Media; using System.Windows.Media.Imaging; using System.Windows.Navigation; using System.Windows.Shapes; using System.Threading; namespace SynchronousExecution { /// <summary> /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml /// </summary> public partial class MainWindow : Window { public MainWindow() { InitializeComponent(); } private void btnStartProcess_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { MessageBox.Show("Starting the long process. Try to click the button below."); for (var loopCounter = 0; loopCounter < 500; loopCounter++) { Thread.Sleep(100); } MessageBox.Show("The process has ended."); } private void btnTryMe_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { MessageBox.Show("User interface is responding!"); } } } Download  SynchronousExecution.zip (52.38 kb) The solution The solution to this problem is to spawn a new thread to execute the long running task.  By placing the execution on a seperate thread, this leaves the main UI thread free to interact with the user's input. Reporting progress  If you execute a long running task, you usually want to let your users know about the progress of the task.  A control to assist with this is the progressbar control.   The WPF progress bar control inherits from the RangeBase class.  The control contains the following properties to control how the progress is displayed to the user. Minimum The minimum value of the Value property. Maximum The maximum value of the Value property. SmallChange The value in which the Value property is incremented. Value The current value position between the Minimum and Maximum property. Multithreading concerns Multithreading is a complex topic and is beyond the scope of this article.  However, there are a few concerns that you must be aware of if you plan to access values on the UI thread from the worker thread. The System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher object is used to execute code on the UI thread from the executing worker thread.  The Dispatcher object has the BeginInvoke method which will execute an asynchronous delegate on the thread in which the dispatcher object was created.  So by using the dispatcher object from the user interface code you are able to access the user interface controls from your worker thread. We'll take a look at another example that will bring all of these concepts together to illustrate executing a long running task on a seperate thread with a progress bar that updates the user interface via the Dispatcher object. The example The example is a WPF application.  The main window contains the following controls; lstRandomValues A ListBox control that will hold random values that are generated during the long running process. The pupose of this control is to illustrate the responsiveness of the user interface during the long running process. prgProgress A ProgressBar control that will illustrate the progress of the long running task. The ProgressBar is hidden by default. It's shown when the long running process begins and is hidden again when the process has ended or is canceled. txtProgress A TextBox control that displays the long running process percentage of completion. btnCancel A Button control that will cancel the long running process and in turn hide the progress bar and progress textbox. btnInteract A Button control that will launch a MessageBox to illustrate the responsiveness of the UI while the long running process is executing. btnBegin A Button control that will begin the long running process. And here is the code  Window1.xaml <Window x:Class="RandomNameSpace.ViewModels.Window1" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" Title="Window1" Height="400" Width="400"> <!-- Parent Grid --> <Grid> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition /> <RowDefinition /> </Grid.RowDefinitions> <Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <ColumnDefinition /> <ColumnDefinition /> </Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <ListBox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Name="lstRandomValues" Grid.ColumnSpan="2" /> <Grid Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="0" Grid.ColumnSpan="2"> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition /> <RowDefinition /> </Grid.RowDefinitions> <Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <ColumnDefinition /> <ColumnDefinition /> </Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <Border Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Grid.ColumnSpan="2" x:Name="bdrProgress" Visibility="Hidden" Background="Azure" CornerRadius="10" BorderBrush="DarkGray" BorderThickness="1" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center"> <StackPanel> <Grid Margin="5"> <ProgressBar x:Name="prgProgress" Width="200" Height="20" Minimum="0" Maximum="1" /> <TextBlock x:Name="txtProgress" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" /> </Grid> <Button x:Name="btnCancel" Content="Cancel" HorizontalAlignment="Right" Margin="3" Click="btnCancel_Click" /> </StackPanel> </Border> <Button Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="1" x:Name="btnInteract" HorizontalAlignment="Center" Content="Interact with UI" Click="btnInteract_Click" Height="23.96" /> <Button Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="0" x:Name="btnBegin" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Content="Start Long Process" Click="btnBegin_Click" Height="23.96" Margin="35,33.27,0,33.27" /> </Grid> </Grid> </Window> Window1.xaml.cs using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Windows; using System.Windows.Controls; using System.Windows.Data; using System.Windows.Documents; using System.Windows.Input; using System.Windows.Media; using System.Windows.Media.Imaging; using System.Windows.Navigation; using System.Windows.Shapes; using System.Threading; using System.Windows.Threading; namespace RandomNameSpace.ViewModels { /// <summary> /// Interaction logic for Window1.xaml /// </summary> public partial class Window1 : Window { private bool IsCanceled = false; private RandomViewModel _viewModel; public RandomViewModel ViewModel { get { return _viewModel; } set { _viewModel = value; } } public Window1() { InitializeComponent(); PrepareViewModel(); } private void PrepareViewModel() { ViewModel = new RandomViewModel(); this.lstRandomValues.DisplayMemberPath = "Value"; this.lstRandomValues.DataContext = ViewModel; this.lstRandomValues.ItemsSource = ViewModel; } private void btnBegin_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { BeginProcess(); } private void btnInteract_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { MessageBox.Show("Interaction!"); } private void btnCancel_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { CancelProcess(); } public void BeginProcess() { bdrProgress.Visibility = System.Windows.Visibility.Visible; DisableBeginButton(); Action StartLoop; StartLoop = () => DoLongRunningProcess(); Thread t; t = new Thread(StartLoop.Invoke); t.Start(); } public void CancelProcess() { this.IsCanceled = true; Thread.Sleep(1500); ClearListBox(); EnableBeginButton(); } private void ClearListBox() { Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, (SendOrPostCallback)delegate { this.ViewModel.Clear(); }, null); } private void DoLongRunningProcess() { for (var loopCounter = 0.0; loopCounter < 1.0; loopCounter = loopCounter + .1) { if (!IsCanceled) { //add a random number to the viewmodel collection to be bound to the listview Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, (SendOrPostCallback)delegate { this.ViewModel.AddValue(1564); }, null); UpdateProgressBar(loopCounter); Thread.Sleep(2000); } else { break; } } IsCanceled = false; ClearListBox(); MessageBox.Show("Completed"); EnableBeginButton(); HideProgressBar(); } private void EnableBeginButton() { Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, (SendOrPostCallback)delegate { this.btnBegin.SetValue(Button.IsEnabledProperty, true); }, null); } private void DisableBeginButton() { Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, (SendOrPostCallback)delegate { this.btnBegin.SetValue(Button.IsEnabledProperty, false); }, null); } private void UpdateProgressBar(double value) { Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, (SendOrPostCallback)delegate { this.prgProgress.SetValue(ProgressBar.ValueProperty, value); }, null); Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, (SendOrPostCallback)delegate { this.txtProgress.SetValue(TextBlock.TextProperty, (value * 100).ToString()); }, null); } private void HideProgressBar() { Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, (SendOrPostCallback)delegate { this.bdrProgress.SetValue(Border.VisibilityProperty, Visibility.Collapsed); }, null); } } }   RandomValue.cs using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.ComponentModel; using System.Linq; using System.Text; namespace RandomNameSpace.ViewModels { public class RandomValue : INotifyPropertyChanged { private int _value; public int Value { get { return _value; } set { if (_value != value) _value = value; OnPropertyChanged("Value"); } } public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged; public void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName) { var handler = PropertyChanged; if (handler != null) { handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName)); } } } } RandomViewModel.cs using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Collections.ObjectModel; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Threading; using System.Windows; using System.Windows.Controls; using System.Windows.Threading; namespace RandomNameSpace.ViewModels { public class RandomViewModel : ObservableCollection<RandomValue> { public RandomViewModel() : base() {} public void AddValue(int value) { Random rnd = new Random(); var calculatedValue = (value * rnd.Next(3000)); this.Add(new RandomValue { Value = (calculatedValue) }); } } } Here is the entire solution for download.  WPFAsyncProgressBarMVVM.zip (77.39 kb)   This concludes the article.  Thank you for taking the time to read it! Until next time... ~/Buddy James kick it on DotNetKicks.com    


How to list local Windows System Services and their dependencies using WPF DataBinding and MVVM

The example I wrote this example in an effort to monitor the Windows Services that are installed on my system at any given time.  I decided to kill two birds with one stone and learn a bit about MVVM, DataBinding, and WPF in the process.  I'll start by showing you a class diagram of the solution.  I'll follow with providing all of the source code snippets for your review.  Finally, I'll explain the application and provide a link for you to download the complete solution. Malware and Windows Services I've learned that Malware as well as viruses often disguise themselves as "normal" Windows services to take advantage of automatic/delayed starting capabilities.  Windows services are also an ideal place for degenerates to place their malicious code because most of your typical Windows users don't take a second look here for problems. Windows Services And here is a screen shot of the application that I wrote to explore the many facets of WPF databinding. As you can see, the application simply lists all Windows service names, Display names, and their dependent services.  The goal was to perform a google search when double clicking a service (you can add this if you like, it's probably about 3 lines of code).  I thought I could easily google suspicious looking services to find any problematic applications.  The ServiceController[] array The .NET framework class library contains an object that describes a Windows Service and it's called the ServiceController.  I decided that I would create a wrapper around this ServiceContoller array with my own object so that I could implement ObservableCollection<> as well as INotifyPropertyChanged to make the collection of objects play nice with WPF's DataBinding.  Here is a class diagram that illustrates the entire application.                   And here's the code.... WindowsService.cs (a wrapper to ServiceController) using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Collections.ObjectModel; using System.ComponentModel; using System.Linq; using System.Text; namespace WindowsServiceMonitor { /// <summary> /// The purpose of this class is to serve as a wrapper class to the /// ServiceController. This class provides propertychange notification /// to allow databinding with WPF. /// </summary> public class WindowsService : INotifyPropertyChanged { #region "private members" private string _serviceName; private string _displayName; private WindowsServiceCollection _dependentServices; #endregion #region "INotifyPropertyChanged event" /// <summary> /// Facilities property change notification and WPF databinding /// </summary> public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged; /// <summary> /// This method is called when any property is changed /// </summary> /// <param name="info"></param> protected void OnPropertyChanged(string info) { PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged; if (handler != null) { handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info)); } } #endregion #region "Public constructors" /// <summary> /// Overloaded constructor /// </summary> /// <param name="serviceName">The short name of the service</param> /// <param name="displayName">The friendly display name of the service</param> /// <param name="dependentServices">An observable collection of windows services</param> public WindowsService(string serviceName, string displayName, WindowsServiceCollection dependentServices) { _serviceName = serviceName; _displayName = displayName; _dependentServices = dependentServices; } /// <summary> /// Default constructor /// </summary> public WindowsService() { } #endregion #region "Public Properties" /// <summary> /// The short name of the service /// </summary> public string ServiceName { get { return _serviceName; } set { _serviceName = value; OnPropertyChanged("ServiceName"); } } /// <summary> /// The friendly display name of the service /// </summary> public string DisplayName { get { return _displayName; } set { _displayName = value; OnPropertyChanged("DisplayName"); } } /// <summary> /// An observable collection of windows services /// </summary> public WindowsServiceCollection DependentServices { get { return _dependentServices; } set { _dependentServices = value; OnPropertyChanged("DependentServices"); } } /// <summary> /// override the object tostring method to return the service name /// </summary> /// <returns></returns> public override string ToString() { return _serviceName; } #endregion } } WindowsServiceCollection.cs (A wrapper to ServiceController[] which inherits ObservableCollection<>) using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Collections.ObjectModel; using System.Linq; using System.ServiceProcess; using System.Text; namespace WindowsServiceMonitor { /// <summary> /// A WPF friendly collection of WindowsService objects /// </summary> public class WindowsServiceCollection : ObservableCollection<WindowsService> { /// <summary> /// Default constructor /// </summary> public WindowsServiceCollection() : base() { } /// <summary> /// Add all windows services to this collection object /// </summary> /// <param name="windowsServices">The current windows service</param> public void LoadServices(ServiceController[] windowsServices) { try { //loop through each root level service dependency foreach (ServiceController service in windowsServices) { //create a new WPF friendly windows service object WindowsService windowsService; windowsService = new WindowsService(); //Set the service properties windowsService.ServiceName = service.ServiceName; windowsService.DisplayName = service.DisplayName; try { //recursivley build the service depdencies WindowsServiceCollection.BuildDependentServiceHierarchy(windowsService, service.DependentServices); } catch (InvalidOperationException exception) { //I've received unable to open ___ service on the computer //I'll use an empty catch until i research the issue. var operationExceptionMessage = exception.Message; } catch (Exception exception) { var generalExceptionMessage = exception.Message; } //add the WPF friendly service to this Observable service collection Add(windowsService); } } catch (Exception ex) { var message = ex.Message; } } /// <summary> /// recursivley build the service depdencies /// </summary> /// <param name="service">the WFP friendly windows service wrapper</param> /// <param name="dependentServices">The collection of windows service dependencies</param> /// <returns></returns> public static void BuildDependentServiceHierarchy(WindowsService service, ServiceController[] dependentServices) { //if we don't have a valid service object if (service == null) //alert the caller throw new NullReferenceException("Invalid service object."); //loop through each dependent service foreach (ServiceController dependentService in dependentServices) { WindowsService dependentServiceWrapper = new WindowsService(dependentService.ServiceName, dependentService.DisplayName, new WindowsServiceCollection()); //build the current service's dependencies WindowsServiceCollection.BuildDependentServiceHierarchy(dependentServiceWrapper, dependentService.DependentServices); //if the depdent services collection has yet to be created if (service.DependentServices == null) //create a new observable collection of dependent services service.DependentServices = new WindowsServiceCollection(); //add the depdency to the wrappers dependents collection service.DependentServices.Add(dependentServiceWrapper); } } } } ServiceMonitorViewModel.cs (This is the ViewModel and it basically loads all ServiceContoller classes and builds the corresponding WindowsServiceCollections and serves the data to the WPF MainWindow view via DataBinding.) using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Collections.ObjectModel; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.ServiceProcess; using System.Windows.Data; namespace WindowsServiceMonitor.ViewModels { public class ServiceMonitorViewModel { private ServiceController[] _serviceControllers; private WindowsServiceCollection _observableServices; public ServiceMonitorViewModel() { this.LoadSystemServices(); this.ObservableWindowsServices = new WindowsServiceCollection(); this.ObservableWindowsServices = _observableServices; //this.ObservableWindowsServices.Source = _observableServices; } public WindowsServiceCollection ObservableWindowsServices { get; set; } private void LoadSystemServices() { _serviceControllers = ServiceController.GetServices(); _observableServices = new WindowsServiceCollection(); _observableServices.LoadServices(_serviceControllers); } } } And finally we have MainWindow.xaml which is our WPF view. <Window x:Class="WindowsServiceMonitor.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:viewModel="clr-namespace:WindowsServiceMonitor.ViewModels" Title="MainWindow" SizeToContent="WidthAndHeight" xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" mc:Ignorable="d"> <Window.Resources> <viewModel:ServiceMonitorViewModel x:Key="WindosServicesViewModel"/> <Style TargetType="ListBoxItem"> <Setter Property="FontFamily" Value="Verdana" /> <Setter Property="FontSize" Value="12"></Setter> <Setter Property="Padding" Value="10"></Setter> </Style> <DataTemplate x:Key="DetailTemplate"> <Border Margin="20" BorderBrush="Aqua" BorderThickness="1" Padding="8"> <Grid ScrollViewer.CanContentScroll="True" ScrollViewer.HorizontalScrollBarVisibility="Auto" ScrollViewer.VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Auto" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" > <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition/> <RowDefinition/> <RowDefinition/> </Grid.RowDefinitions> <Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <ColumnDefinition/> <ColumnDefinition/> </Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <TextBlock Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Text="Service Name:"/> <TextBlock Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="1" Text="{Binding Path=ServiceName}"/> <TextBlock Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="0" Text="Display Name:"/> <TextBlock Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="1" Text="{Binding Path=DisplayName}"/> <TextBlock Grid.Row="2" Grid.Column="0" Text="Dependents:"/> <ListBox Name="lstDependentServices" Grid.Row="2" Grid.Column="1" IsSynchronizedWithCurrentItem="True" ItemsSource="{Binding Path=DependentServices}" DisplayMemberPath="DisplayName" /> </Grid> </Border> </DataTemplate> </Window.Resources> <DockPanel> <StackPanel> <TextBlock>Windows Services</TextBlock> <ListBox Name="lstServices" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" Height="300" HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch" VerticalContentAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" DataContext="{Binding Source={StaticResource WindosServicesViewModel}}" ScrollViewer.VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Auto" IsSynchronizedWithCurrentItem="True" ItemsSource="{Binding ObservableWindowsServices}"/> <TextBlock Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Text="Service Properties" /> <ContentControl DataContext="{Binding Source={StaticResource WindosServicesViewModel}}" Content="{Binding ObservableWindowsServices}" ContentTemplate="{StaticResource DetailTemplate}" /> </StackPanel> </DockPanel> </Window> And that about wraps it up.  Please note that each WindowsServiceCollection contains a WindowsServiceCollection of dependent windows services.  Also notice the many different uses of WPF databinding.  We bind the root level WindowsServiceCollection to a ListView and we bind  some TextBlocks to it's selection so that way when the user clicks to select a service, we can display a details view of the specified service. That's pretty much all there is to it.  I can say that I learned a lot by writing this application and I had a lot of fun as well. Here is a link to the entire solution for you to download WindowsServiceMonitor.zip (2.92 mb)  I hope you have enjoyed this post and I hope you will check back soon! Thanks! ~/Buddy James     kick it on DotNetKicks.com  


About the author

My name is Buddy James.  I'm a Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer from the Nashville, TN area.  I'm a Software Engineer, an author, a blogger (http://www.refactorthis.net), a mentor, a thought leader, a technologist, a data scientist, and a husband.  I enjoy working with design patterns, data mining, c#, WPF, Silverlight, WinRT, XAML, ASP.NET, python, CouchDB, RavenDB, Hadoop, Android(MonoDroid), iOS (MonoTouch), and Machine Learning. I love technology and I love to develop software, collect data, analyze the data, and learn from the data.  When I'm not coding,  I'm determined to make a difference in the world by using data and machine learning techniques. (follow me at @budbjames).  

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